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Showing tonight

Mon, May 28 /

Showing tonight

Pat Byrne

Tue, May 29 / 730 PM

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Pat Byrne – is an Irish Musician offering a Roots Americana sound with an Irish twist. 


This Irish singer and recording artist hails from Borris, County Carlow. Byrne won the “The Voice of Ireland," in 2012. 


Pat's voice strikes an emotional chord with his audience; ranging from seductive whisper one moment, to full-bodied rock 'n' roll growl the next. If you want to see one of the great success stories from the sundry of talent show winners, this is a can't miss.


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Game Night - Irish Session

Wed, May 30 / 730 PM

Board games are hot right now — whether it’s the new Euro-style games like Settlers of Catan, Carcassonne, 7 Wonders or Power Grid, or you’re kickin’ it old school with traditional games like the Trumpesque, land-grabbing Monopoly. For a great midweek diversion, head on over to the Mucky Duck for a pint and a little tabletop competition; they’ve been at it for almost 25 years. We checked in with Stevie Hazlewood, day manager for McGonigel’s Mucky Duck, and she says the club stocks a nice selection of titles for the Wednesday night Game Night and Irish Session. 


“It runs the gamut from Connect Four, to Scrabble, Yahtzee, Risk, three different versions of Monopoly, Scattergories, Cards Against Humanity,” says Hazlewood. Play one of those games or bring your own, and scarf down pub snacks like fish and chips, Welsh rarebit and the club’s famous shepherd’s pie. 


Best of all, there’s no cover. 7:30 p.m. 


- Susie Tommaney - Houston Press


Irish Session starts 7:30

Showing tonight

Lex Land

Thu, May 31 / 7 PM

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Lex Land is a singer-songwriter and jazz vocalist originally from Southern California currently residing in Austin, TX. She has released two albums with a third to be released in 2017, and was a member of Team Blake on Season 2 of NBC’s The Voice.


Originally aspiring to a career in classical music, Land dropped out of her vocal performance program at a university in Orange, California to pursue her pop ambitions. In 2009, she left Los Angeles to make Austin her home.


Lex began recording her debut album, “Orange Days on Lemon Street” (which critics deemed “a fantastic mix of honey sweet folk and dense, beat driven folk-rock”), at age 19 . In 2011 she followed it up with a more eclectic, electrified, and genre-hopping sophomore record, “Were My Sweetheart To Go.” Both records earned “Best of iTunes” honors and also received several featured song placements on television programs, including “Private Practice”, “Castle”, and “Bones.”


In the midst of supporting her two previously released albums, Lex represented Austin, TX as a Team-Blake-finalist on NBC’s “The Voice” in 2012. She has also been invited to perform multiple times on late night television’s “Last Call with Carson Daly,” as well as over the radio airwaves on tastemaker stations such as KCRW’s venerated “Morning Becomes Eclectic.”


In Texas Lex has truly blossomed- taking the state by storm with her solo Jeff-Buckley-esque cabaret performances, hitting home-runs with her band, or stealing the show sitting in at jazz clubs.


Quotes:

• “When you think ‘singer songwriter,’ ‘fierce’ is not a word that often comes to mind. But there is something slightly fierce about the opening seconds of Lex Land’s new album ‘Were My Sweetheart To Go.’ It’s the track ‘Oh My!’ and it just reaches out and grabs you…”- KCRW – Artist You Should Know


• “She’s a great songwriter. She makes herself very vulnerable and her lyrics are revealing about relationships and all those universal themes we love. She really separates herself from the pack with her demeanor and her lyrics. She’s got attitude, she’s cool.”- Jason Bentley – KCRW


• “When I think of great female artists, past and present, some of the names I think of are Stevie Nicks, Fiona Apple, Patsy Cline, and Ann Wilson. Among that list, Lex Land deserves a spot. Not only is she one of the most underrated artists on the scene right now, but she somehow molds her voice so well, she’s able to sing any and every genre. If I had to put together a soundtrack of my life, Lex Land would be the prominent artist featured on it.” – Sounds That Matter


• “Easily, one of the best singer-songwriters in town right now and one of the finest voices we have ever heard, period. Believe it…”- LA-Underground


• “…give a listen to album standout ‘If I,’ which showcases Land’s subtle-yet-powerful control melody as well as her undeniable vocal prowess.”- KUT – Song of the Day

Showing tonight

Mary Gauthier

Fri, June 1 / 7 PM

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Rifles and Rosary Beads

New studio album co-written with wounded combat veterans over the last four years via SongwritingWith:Soldiers.

Every day.

Every single day, which means some days are better and some much worse.

Every day, on average, twenty-two veterans commit suicide. Each year seventy-four hundred current and former members of the United States Armed Services take their own lives.

Every day.

That number does not include drug overdoses or car wrecks or any of the more inventive ways somebody might less obviously choose to die.

It seems trivial to suggest those lives might be saved — healed, even — by a song. By the process of writing a song.

And yet.

And yet there is nothing trivial about Mary Gauthier’s tenth album, Rifles and Rosary Beads (Thirty Tigers), all eleven songs co-written with and for wounded veterans. Eleven of the nearly four hundred songs that highly accomplished songwriters have co-written as part of Darden Smith’s five-year-old SongwritingWith:Soldiers program.

None of the soldiers who have participated in the program have taken their own lives, and there’s nothing trivial about that. Something about writing that song — telling that story — is healing. What Smith calls post-traumatic-growth.

Gauthier’s first nine albums presented extraordinary confessional songs, deeply personal, profoundly emotional pieces ranging from “I Drink,” a blunt accounting of addiction, to “March 11, 1962,” the day she was born — and relinquished to an orphanage — to “Worthy,” in which the singer finally understands she is deserving of love. Maybe that’s where the confessional song cycle ends, for she has midwifed these eleven new songs in careful collaboration with other souls whose struggle is urgent, immediate, and palpable. And none are about her.

Each song on Rifles and Rosary Beads is a gut punch: deceptively simple and emotionally complex. From the opening “Soldiering On” (“What saves you in the battle/Can kill you at home”) to “Bullet Holes in the Sky” (“They thank me for my service/And wave their little flags/They genuflect on Sundays/And yes, they’d send us back”), to the abject horror of “Iraq,” and its quiet depiction of a female mechanic’s rape, each song tells the story of a deeply wounded veteran.

Darrell Scott, returning from one of Smith’s first retreats, called and told Mary she needed to participate. “I felt unqualified,” she says. “I didn’t know anything about the military, I was terrified of fucking it up. I didn’t feel I knew how to be in the presence of that much trauma without being afraid. But Darrell knew I could do it. Turns out, I was able to sit with the veterans with a sense of calmness and help them articulate their suffering without fear. I was shocked by that. And I took to it.”

It has become a calling. “My job as a songwriter is to find that thing a soul needs to say,” Mary says. “Each retreat brings together a dozen or so soldiers and four songwriters, three songs each in two days. We don’t have a choice. We have to stay focused, listen carefully, and make sure every veteran gets their own song. And we always do.”

“None of the veterans are artists. They don’t write songs, they don’t know that songs can be used to move trauma. Their understanding of song doesn’t include that. For me it’s been the whole damn deal. Songwriting saved me. It’s what I think the best songs do, help articulate the ineffable, make the invisible visible, creating resonance, so that people, (including the songwriter) don’t feel alone.”

The impact of these songs becomes visible quickly, unexpectedly.

Featured in the TV series “Nashville,” the Bluebird Cafe now prospers as a tourist destination. The room fills twice a night with people thrilled to be in the presence of real live Nashville songwriters.

Who, in turn, are thrilled to be in the presence of a paying audience that can do nothing to advance their careers, save give a genuine response to their songs.

The gentleman at the next table has handsome white hair and a hundred-dollar casual shirt, and almost certainly had no idea who Mary Gauthier was, nor what her songs might be about, when he came out of the sunlight into the darkened listening room. He knows, now. Thick, manicured fingers cover his face, trying to catch his slow tears. His wife sits close, watches carefully, but knows better than to touch him.

He is not alone in that small audience.

Every day we are touched by the veterans in our lives, whether we know it or not.

Every single day. Even if it’s only the guy on Main Street, in the wheelchair, with the flag.

Every single day.

And, yes, a song may be the answer.

“Because the results are so dramatic, this could work for other traumas,” Mary says. “Trauma is the epidemic. You say opioid, I say trauma epidemic. As an addict, I know addiction is self-medication because of suffering, and beneath that pain is always trauma. Underneath so much of the problems in the world is trauma, it’s the central issue humanity is dealing with. We’ve found something powerful here, that brings hope to people who are hurting. So they know they are not alone.” 

Coming to McGonigel's Mucky Duck on June 1st, American folk singer Mary Gauthier is sure to please our audiences with her stellar vocals and down-to-earth vibe. Our music venue in Houston is ready to introduce this talented singer on a mission to give a real voice to the soldiers in our lives. Revealing untold stories post-war, soldiers and their families' experiences are weaved throughout Mary's tear-jerking lyrics.


Songwriting With Soldiers


Mary Gauthier is a part of a non-profit program that helps soldiers share their unique perspectives while creating proactive results. Songwriting With Soldiers gives military members an opportunity to share their struggles with skillful songwriters. After spending time with and listening to the unique stories of active duty members, Mary and other songwriters pen their inspirations down in lyrical form to share with the world. Servicewomen and men are often forgotten in society, so Mary's lyrics and musical talent allow audiences a first-hand account of a true soldier's perspective so that they can be remembered.


Folk Music with Focus


For over 20 years, Mary Gauthier has regaled audiences with her keen sense of importance in the healing therapy music offers. From tumultuous beginnings and despite her own personal difficulties, Mary's musical ability continues to push her forward to inspire fans and encourage those facing struggles. Her appreciation for the military men and women show in her various song choices and album offerings.


As Mary sees the trauma of war through the eyes of those lives who have suffered from it, she filters their pain into music so music lovers can experience the truth in tragedy. Through her words, the unidentified demons of post-war are given a face, an identity to battle, and perhaps the forgotten soldiers can feel like they have a purpose again.


Connecting Dots


Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, and given up for adoption as a young child, making connections is that much more important to Gauthier. Her southern Americana singing style pulls country music lovers in. The deep-seeded sense of purpose she weaves into her songs keep her fans wanting more.


One of her latest albums called Rifles & Rosaries provides candid illustrations of the turmoil that exists within the soldiers and their loved ones. The War After War song on the album is co-written by Mary and six soldier spouses. She appeals to people from every walk of life. Deeply ensconced in Mary Gauthier's lyrics is a sense of crossing boundaries, of needing to initiate thought-provoking change.


If you're craving a raw and honest performance, look no further than Mary Gauthier's heart-tugging story-telling on our stage at McGonigel's Mucky Duck in Houston!


Showing tonight

Garrett Lebeau

Fri, June 1 / 930 PM

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GARRETT LEBEAU WAS BORN AND RAISED ON THE WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION NEAR LANDER WYOMING AND IS AN ENROLLED MEMBER OF THE SHOSHONE TRIBE. SPEAKING TO BOTH HIS PLAYING AND FORMATIVE YEARS, HE HAS THIS TO SAY...

"Growing up we listened to very little music. There was mostly just the 80's top 40 so, we didn't listen much to the radio. there was so much wide open space, I think that is in the music somehow. I didn't really start playing much until I was out of school and then it was a very slow process where I taught myself  notes and chords. 

The Blues spoke to me, the raw unadorned honesty is what still motivates me musically.. It spans all styles. When I say soul, I mean "SOUL" you know when music has it.I am not speaking of some narrow definition for a style of music. I speak of music with spirit about life... the trials and tribulations of the working man. Folk music is kin in spirit as is most music that I love.

My goal is to connect with other like minded human beings, to keep the tradition of soul music alive. Where you write, play and sing from your own self - Just like the early blues musicians.. Feeling has no genre". "Rise to the Grind" is Garrett Lebeau's debut album on Jimmy Lefave's Music Road Records.