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Showing tonight

Open Mic

Mon, February 19 / 630 PM

No cover charge.


You’ll hear plenty of folk, country and acoustic renditions by performers that spent their afternoon in classes at Rice or a long day at the office. Not only does the pub feature an impressive array of live music almost every night, but the Mucky Duck has been listed by Billboard Magazine as one of the 20 best acoustic venues in the country. Each performer gets three songs or 15 minutes on stage. -- houston.cbslocal.com


The Duck stage is open for you to present your original compositions or a favorite song made famous by someone else. 


Comedians, poets, jugglers and mimes also welcome. 


Don't be shy. Come on out ~ It's your turn to be a Mucky Duck Open Mic Star.


Each performer has 3 songs or 15 minutes for their performance. 


Showing tonight

Stephanie Urbina Jones

Tue, February 20 / 730 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

CD Release for Shaman Heart with special guests Patterson Barrett and John Inmon 


One woman's prayer in the dark and journey of faith, in song — from being born to love, to making peace with her past and troubled soul through unraveling, wandering through the wilderness, to finally being born from the blues and finding something to sing about. 


She reclaims her innocence, begins living and loving, gratefully, hand to faith and finally finds the freedom, passion, and purpose in chiselin' out her soul through the whole bittersweet beautiful ride.


In Shaman Heart,  Jones opens up her heart and her closet to share the skeletons that were the medicine that freed her soul.

Showing tonight

Game Night - Irish Session

Wed, February 21 / 730 PM

Board games are hot right now — whether it’s the new Euro-style games like Settlers of Catan, Carcassonne, 7 Wonders or Power Grid, or you’re kickin’ it old school with traditional games like the Trumpesque, land-grabbing Monopoly. For a great midweek diversion, head on over to the Mucky Duck for a pint and a little tabletop competition; they’ve been at it for almost 25 years. We checked in with Stevie Hazlewood, day manager for McGonigel’s Mucky Duck, and she says the club stocks a nice selection of titles for the Wednesday night Game Night and Irish Session. 


“It runs the gamut from Connect Four, to Scrabble, Yahtzee, Risk, three different versions of Monopoly, Scattergories, Cards Against Humanity,” says Hazlewood. Play one of those games or bring your own, and scarf down pub snacks like fish and chips, Welsh rarebit and the club’s famous shepherd’s pie. 


Best of all, there’s no cover. 7:30 p.m. 


- Susie Tommaney - Houston Press

Showing tonight

Hayes Carll

Thu, February 22 / 7 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

It's easy to lose Hayes Carll the performer in the midst of Hayes Carll the songwriter. 


Sometimes, as with the Grammy-nominated “Chances Are,” recorded by Lee Ann Womack last year, the song feels bigger than the man. That’s a beautiful thing — something that most songwriters cannot say — but it doesn’t always translate well to the stage. Despite that initial inkling, Carll undeniably delivered the emotional range of this unbelievable track. This lush performance last night was a real glimmer of super stardom amongst his otherwise quiet aura.


The wall-to-wall crowd is also indicative of a broader point: Carll’s undeniable appeal. Carll writes songs that we all wish we’d written ourselves, the kind of lyrics that punch you in the gut and make you tear up and laugh all at the same time. 


Somehow, he manages to press every emotional button — the fear you feel when red and blue lights are in the rearview and you’re holding weed; the wrenching sadness of a soldier killed at war — without being overwrought or dramatic. This lyrical potency makes the lighter moments, like “Bible on the Dash,” even better.


It doesn’t hurt that Carll has been able to seamlessly blend Americana, Texas country and honky tonk music into this unique sound that is universally appealing to anyone who likes a little bit of twang in their tunes. More to the point, it's a sound that is respected. It's a sound that can make a generally raucous Dallas crowd shut the hell up and sit in their seats and really listen. - Dallas Observer

Showing tonight

Giulia Millanta

Thu, February 22 / 930 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

with Gabriel Rhodes


“The best and scariest thing about Giulia Millanta is not just that she is truly a tightrope walker herself but that she continually pulls YOU out there with her… with melodies, singing, stories, imagery. No matter what language her lyrics may be in… and I’ve lost count of how many her lyrics use here… she’s always understandable because her music is, like any fine art, universally recognizable. I can’t wait for her next one!” - Dave Marsh


“Giulia’s words are refreshingly real, full of hip concepts and well turned phrases seated in interesting melodies. Listening to her songs for the first time is like finally finding that great book or being drawn into a movie where you can’t wait to see what’s going to happen next.”  -  Kimmie Rhodes

 

"First of all I'm a fan of Giulia's! She appears as a rocker with the voice of a songbird and songs with the insight and edge of a truly gifted artist." - Michael Fracasso


"She is a deeply evocative singer with a dash of Piaf, a sprinkle of Lady Day, a pinch of Norah Jones and a teaspoon of Madeleine Peroux." - Michael Greenblatt The Aquarian Weekly

 

"these songs come from the heart and the mind, what takes place is seen through the singers eyes, what is felt is what she feels, and oh she is curious, feisty, humorous, yet introspective." - Next Best Thing Music

 

Singer-songwriter, Giulia (Julia) Millanta, is a native-born Italian from Florence who now calls Austin, Texas home. A creative and prolific artist, she has released four albums touring regionally, nationally throughout the USA and internationally. An accomplished guitarist, Giulia also plays ukulele and sings in four languages. She has been described by critics as being “deeply evocative with a dash of Piaf, a sprinkle of Lady Day, a pinch of Norah Jones and a teaspoon of Medeleine Peroux.” She has been called smart, pensive and cool and credited with psychedelic grooveability whilst “baring her clairvoyant soul” to “deliver musical mojo.” 

Showing tonight

Charlie Faye and the Fayettes

Fri, February 23 / 7 PM

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"Musically, the group hearkens to Motown, Spector or the Brill Building: Charlie is emerging as a budding Carole King, and the songs are good enough to rate comparison to Goffin & King or Mann & Weil." - Huffington Post 

 

"In a world of new soul singers who actually get what they're talking about, enter the name of Charlie Faye and her unbeatable Fayettes to that list. They could go all the way." - Bill Bentley, The Morton Report 

 

"The album stretches beyond the coy boundaries of ‘60s girl groups with the opener 'Green Light,' and though 'Eastside' could usher dancers down a Soul Train line, its Stax-styled groove and horn chart service a serious look at social gentrification." - No Depression

 

"It’s impossible not to be enchanted by one of this year’s freshest, most delightful and all around grooviest releases." - American Songwriter

Showing tonight

South Austin Moonlighters

Fri, February 23 / 930 PM

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“A southside collective of songwriters modeled loosely on the template established by Saxon supergroup the Resentments a decade ago, the S.A.Moonlighters take a big step with “Burn & Shine,” their first studio album. 


Former members of Mother Truckers, Stonehoney and Monte Montgomery’s touring band collaborate on an eclectic mix of rock, soul, funk, blues, country and more; whereas the previous live disc was highlighted by covers, they’re now bringing their own material to the fore. Highly Recommended.” 

Showing tonight

Fruit Bats (solo) & Vetiver (solo)

Sat, February 24 / 7 PM

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Andy Cabic (of Vetiver)

Have you been sitting at that computer all day? You’re overdue for a break. The new Vetiver album, The Errant Charm, is a superb soundtrack for an afternoon idyll. Take a moment to load the record on your mp3 player. Hell, if you still have a Walkman, the whole thing fits neatly on one side of a C-90 cassette tape. Select your favorite pair of headphones, and go for a stroll.


This album was made for walking. Vetiver bandleader Andy Cabic spent hours wandering the streets around San Francisco’s Richmond District, listening to rough mixes, tinkering with lyrics and arrangements. You can hear his strides in the tempo of “Hard To Break,” which captures the brisk gait one might adopt while passing through a public green space: Not hurried, just excited to be heading somewhere.


Eric D. Johnson (of the Fruit Bats)

Sometimes a story can take a long time to tell. Eric D. Johnson, who has recorded and performed as the Fruit Bats for a decade now, had a story like that, a chance encounter that had rattled around his head for years. He’s tried to write it as a short story, a play, a movie…yet until now couldn’t get it down just right. Finally he decided to make a song out of it, and the result is “Tony the Tripper.” It’s the song at the heart of his fifth album, Tripper, setting the tone for a bittersweet meditation on hitting the road, leaving the familiar behind and reinventing yourself.


The story goes like this. Just after turning 20, Johnson boarded a train from Chicago to see his sister in Olympia, Washington. A grizzled vagabond—Tony—took the seat next to him for the ride to Fargo, North Dakota. Over the next 12 hours the two developed a strange relationship, the cantankerous oldster alternately bullying and befriending Johnson. A decade or so later, Johnson is still bemused by the encounter, wondering what he could have learned from this broken, frightening, but fascinating character. The song “Tony the Tripper” imagines the two of them heading out on a road trip, the idealist and the outlaw cutting a swath across America.

Showing tonight

Ray Bonneville & Gurf Morlix

Sat, February 24 / 930 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

Ray Bonneville is a poet of the demimonde who didn’t write his first song until his early 40s, some 20 years after he started performing. But with a style that sometimes draws comparisons to JJ Cale and Daniel Lanois, this blues-influenced, New Orleans-inspired “song and groove man,” as he’s been so aptly described, luckily found his rightful calling.  Born in Quebec, his family moved to Boston when he was 12. He served a year in Vietnam as a Marine, struggled and overcame drug addiction, earned a pilot’s license in Colorado, then moved to Alaska, then Seattle, and Paris and New Orleans. But it took a close call while piloting a seaplane across the Canadian wilderness to make him decide it was time to get busy writing songs – gritty narratives inspired by a lifetime of hard-won knowledge set against his gritty, soulful guitar and harmonica playing.


He’s since earned many accolades, including a Juno Award for his 1999 album, Gust of Wind. His post-Katrina ode, “I Am the Big Easy,” earned the International Folk Alliance’s 2009 Song of the Year Award, and in 2012, Bonneville won the solo/duet category in the Blues Foundation’s International Blues Challenge. He has guested on albums by Mary Gauthier, Gurf Morlix, Eliza Gilkyson, Ray Wylie Hubbard and other prominent artists, and shared songwriting credits with Tim O’Brien, Phil Roy and Morlix, among others. Slaid Cleaves placed Bonneville’s “Run Jolee Run” on his lauded 2009 album, Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away.


Easy Gone, Ray’s fourth album for Red House Records,  takes listeners to some of the dark spaces and exotic places Bonneville has gone on his own travels. An Austin resident since 2006, Bonneville still puts the rhythms and soul of New Orleans into much of his music. His songs carry a groove and momentum that’s uniquely his — and will always be a part of him, no matter where he roams.




Visiting planet Gurf has always been an enlightening experience. After all, this Gurf Morlix fellow – Buffalo born, Texas bred – has provided us with countless indelible musical moments in the last 40-plus years: his exemplary guitar and production work with Lucinda Williams; his instrumental accompaniment to artists ranging from Blaze Foley to Warren Zevon; his production of watermark albums for artists such as Ray Wylie Hubbard, Robert Earl Keen and Mary Gauthier – and, since 2000, a series of eight solo records that have a singular worldview and can be both harrowing and heartening, often at the same time.


Now, prepare yourself for “The Soul And The Heal”. Gurf Morlix’s ninth album is another chapter in a songbook that pithily relates the human condition. But though Morlix’s signatures are still present on this masterstroke – lyrics that don’t waste a syllable, instrumentation without a spare note – there is also a hopefulness and vulnerability not always readily evident on his recent releases. The fact that “The Soul And The Heal” is pivotal for Gurf is immediately clear from the striking front cover image of a heart-shaped cherry with its pit exposed, and from the stark title that he says speaks to “the healing of the soul from all the damage we inflict on ourselves”.


It would be too easy to attribute Gurf’s evolution to the fact that in February 2016 he suffered a heart attack while dead stopped in the fast lane, in a traffic jam, on his way to a gig. In fact these new songs were all written before this episode, from which he has fully recovered. But there’s no doubt the emotions stirred by the unexpected December 2014 passing of Gurf’s musical mate, rock keyboard legend Ian McLagan, contributed to the career pinnacle that “The Soul And The Heal” is for Morlix.


The album was recorded at his Rootball home studio. Morlix comes by his musical minimalism naturally: “It’s the way my brain is wired. I like to hear everything clearly.” It’s a solitary sound, different from the sonics he brought to his outside productions – but, as always, it’s anchored by Morlix’s sinewy, expressive guitar. The other constant is drummer Rick Richards – who shares Morlix’s straightforward aesthetic (and whose rhythms Gurf echoes with two foot drums during his almost 100 solo gigs a year).


This batch of songs yields the expected Morlix darkness and humor, but woven between are numbers imbued with a warm light. The call to positive action on “Move Someone,” the mindfulness of “Right Now” and the sensitive finale “The Best We Can” balance this focused collection, an album that manages to run the gamut of emotions without being cloying or obvious.


With “The Soul And The Heal” Morlix continues to create his own singular musical universe, but the yin and yang of his outlook has never been as in sync as it is now, making it even more inviting to join him on Planet Gurf.

- Jody Denberg  2017